The origin of rice cultivation in the Lower Yangtze Region, China

Original Paper

Abstract

About the former half of the sixth millennium bc (Kuahuqiao culture) settlement area expanded to alluvial lowlands in the lower Yangtze region, and during the fifth millennium bc (Hemudu culture), adaptation to the wetland settings established. Although older rice remains have been found in this area, it is safe to say that rice cultivation began during Kuahuqiao and Hemudu cultures. At the beginning, it was only a part of broad-spectrum production highly dependent on lacustrine resources, and it took another millennium to establish the ancient civilization (Liangzhu culture) based on rice cultivation.

Keywords

Tianluoshan site Hemudu culture Broad-spectrum subsistence Rice cultivation 

References

  1. Center for the Study of Chinese Archaeology, Beijing University, Zhejiang Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology and Survey Team of Tianluoshan Site (eds) (2008) General study of the ecofacts from Tianluoshan Site. Center for the Study of Chinese Archaeology, Beijing University, Beijing (in Chinese)Google Scholar
  2. Crawford GW, Chen X, Wang J (2006) Houli culture rice from the Yuezhuang site, Jinan. Dongfang Kaogu 3:247–251 (in Chinese)Google Scholar
  3. Fuller DQ (2007) Contrasting patterns in crop domestication and domestication rates: recent archaeobotanical insights from the Old World. Ann Bot 100:903–924CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Fuller DQ, Qin L, Zhao Z, Zheng Y, Hosoya L-A, Chen X, Sun G (2008) Archaeobotanical analysis at Tian Luo Shan: evidence for wild-food gathering, rice cultivation and the process of the evolution of morphologically domesticated rice. In: Center for the Study of Chinese Archaeology, Beijing University etc. (eds), pp 9–67Google Scholar
  5. Fuller DQ, Qin L, Zheng Y, Zhao Z, Chen X, Hosoya LA, Sun G (2009) The domestication process and domestication rate in rice: spikelet bases from the Lower Yangtze. Science 323:1607–1610CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Henan Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology (1999) Henan provincial institute of cultural relics and archaeology, Wuyang Jiahu (2 vols.). Science Press, Beijing (in Chinese)Google Scholar
  7. Hunan Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology (2006) Hunan provincial institute of cultural relics and archaeology, Pengtoushan and Bashidang (2 vols.). Science Press, Beijing (in Chinese)Google Scholar
  8. Jiang L, Liu L (2006) New evidence for the origins of sedentism and rice domestication in the Lower Yangzi River, China. Antiquity 80:355–361Google Scholar
  9. Kanehara M, Zheng Y (2008) Diatom, pollen and parasite egg analyses at Tianluoshan site. In: Center for the Study of Chinese Archaeology. Beijing University, etc. (eds), pp 177–188 (in Chinese)Google Scholar
  10. Li A (ed) (2009) Tianluoshan site: a new window of Hemudu culture. Xileng Yinshe Press, Hangzhou (in Chinese)Google Scholar
  11. Nakajima T, Nakajima M, Sun G (2008) Pharyngeal tooth remains of cyprinids from the fish-bone pit K3 at Tianluoshan Site in China, with remarks on the relationship between freshwater fishing and rice cultivation in the Neolithic age. In: Center for the Study of Chinese Archaeology, Beijing University, etc. (eds), pp 137–161 (in Chinese)Google Scholar
  12. Nakamura S-I (2002) The archaeology of rice. Douseisha, Tokyo (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  13. Nakamura S-I (2005) Le riz, le jade et la ville: Évolution des sociétés néolithiques du Yangzi. Annales: Histoire, Sciences Sociales 60(5):1009–1034Google Scholar
  14. Vaughan DA, Lu B, Tomooka N (2008) The evolving story of rice evolution. Plant Sci 174:394–408Google Scholar
  15. Yuan J (2002) Rice and pottery 10 000 yrs. BP at Yuchanyan, Dao county, Hunan province. In: Yasuda Y (ed) The origins of pottery and agriculture. Roli Books, New Delhi, pp 157–166Google Scholar
  16. Zhang C (2002) Early pottery and rice phytolith remains from Xianrendong and Diaotonghuan sites, Wannian, Jiangxi province. In: Yasuda Y (ed) The origins of pottery and agriculture. Roli Books, New Delhi, pp 185–192Google Scholar
  17. Zhang C, Hung H-C (2008) The neolithic of Southern China: origin, development, and dispersal. Asian Perspect 47(2):299–329CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Zhang Y, Yuan J, Huang W, Matsui A, Sun G (2008) Interim report of the faunal remains recovered from Tianluoshan site in 2004. In: Center for the Study of Chinese Archaeology. Beijing University, etc. (eds), pp 101–136 (in Chinese)Google Scholar
  19. Zhao Z, Zhang J (2009) Report on the analysis of the results of the 2001 floatation of the Jiahu site. Kaogu 8:84–93 (in Chinese)Google Scholar
  20. Zhejiang Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology and Pujiang County Museum (2007) Excavation of the Shangshan site in Pujiang County, Zhejiang. Kaogu 9:7–18 (in Chinese)Google Scholar
  21. Zhejiang Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology and Xiaoshan Museum (2004) Kuahuqiao. Cultural Relics Publishing House, Beijing (in Chinese)Google Scholar
  22. Zheng Y, Jiang L (2007) Remains of ancient rice unearthed from the Shangshan site and their significance. Kaogu 9:19–25 (in Chinese)Google Scholar
  23. Zohary D (2007) Unconscious selection and the evolution of domesticated plants. Econ Bot 58(1):5–10CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan

Personalised recommendations