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Seismotectonic map and seismicity parameters for Amaravati area, India

Abstract

The objective of the present study is to develop a seismotectonic map and seismicity parameters for the Amaravati area, part of Peninsular India. Amaravati is the proposed capital of Andhra Pradesh, India. The seismic influence zone for the present study is considered as a circular area within a 400 km radius from the High Court of Andhra Pradesh. A total of 919 earthquake events of all ranges of magnitude are covered under a specified influence zone. An earthquake catalog containing both historical and instrumental earthquake events of a moment magnitude (MW) ≥ 3.5 from the year 1800 to 2020 is compiled from various sources. Main shocks were identified from the raw catalog and the completeness analysis was carried out. The magnitude of completeness for the present catalog data is fairly complete at the moment magnitude (MW) of 2.7. The completeness period for different classes of magnitude such as 3.5–3.99, 4.0–4.49, 4.5–4.99, 5.0–5.49, 5.5–5.99, and MW ≥ 6 is 50, 60, 60, 65, 220, and 220 years respectively. The estimated seismicity parameters a and b values for the Amaravati area are in the range of 2.70 to 3.6 and from 0.75 to 0.88, respectively. The maximum expected earthquake magnitude of Amaravati was found to be 6.7. The fault map and seismotectonic map of the Amaravati region were also developed, which are very useful for seismic hazard analyses.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would also like to thank National Earthquake Information Centre (NEIC), United States Geological Survey (USGS), Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS), and International Seismological Centre (ISC) for providing the details of earthquake events in the study area. The authors extend their thanks to Dr. Sreevalsa Kolathayar (Assistant Professor, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal) for his valuable inputs in this study. The authors would also like to thank the Science and Engineering Research Board, Department of Science and Technology, Government of India for providing the funding for this research work.

Funding

This study is funded by the Science and Engineering Research Board, Department of Science and Technology, Government of India (SRG/2019/001810).

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Correspondence to Bande Giridhar Rajesh.

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The authors declare no competing interests.

Additional information

Communicated by Longjun Dong.

Appendix

Appendix

Table 7 Earthquake catalog of MW ≥ 3.5 for Amarvati region, Andhra Pradesh, India

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Satyannarayana, R., Rajesh, B.G. Seismotectonic map and seismicity parameters for Amaravati area, India. Arab J Geosci 14, 2414 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12517-021-08622-x

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Keywords

  • Fault map
  • Seismicity parameters
  • Seismotectonic map
  • Magnitude of completeness
  • Gutenberg-Richter law
  • Completeness analysis
  • Amaravathi