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Dam-induced changes in flood hydrology and flood frequency of tropical river: a study in Damodar River of West Bengal, India

Abstract

The Damodar River of West Bengal is popularized as ‘Sorrow of Bengal’ due to massive unpredictable destruction in the monsoonal floods, recorded since 1665. After establishment of Damodar Valley Corporation (DVC) of India in 1948, Tilaiya, Tenughat, Konar, Maithon and Panchet dams (Jharkhand) and Durgapur barrage (West Bengal) are built to regulate flood flow to a certain limit. But, as the floods were unpredictable in pre-dam phase, even now, lower Damodar Basin is not secure from the monsoonal floods. To assess the flood risk and nature of flood discharge, we have focused here to fit extreme value distribution (EVD) to the annual peak flow of the Damodar River using mainly Gumbel and log Pearson type III distributions. Pre-dam (1934–1957) and post-dam (1958–2007) flood frequency analysis has significantly projected maximum probable flood discharge of Damodar at Rhondia with a certain return period of occurrence, and it provides an idea about future flood risk in lower Damodar Basin.

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Acknowledgments

We are very much thankful to Prof. Sutapa Mukhopadhyay (Dept. of Geography, Visva-Bharati), Prof. Shukla Acharjee (Dept. of Applied Geology, Dibrugarh University), Prof. Ashis Sarkar (Dept. of Geography, Chandannagar Govt. College) and Prof. Priyank Pravin Patel (Dept. of Geography, Presidency University) for their critical review and suggestions about this research work. We are thankful to Prof. Joy Sanyal (Dept. of Geography, Presidency University) for providing his great research papers on the flood modelling of the Damodar River. We are sincerely grateful to Prof. Abdullah M. Al-Amri (Editor-in-Chief, Arabian Journal of Geosciences) for giving his support and suggestions to enrich the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Sandipan Ghosh.

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Ghosh, S., Guchhait, S.K. Dam-induced changes in flood hydrology and flood frequency of tropical river: a study in Damodar River of West Bengal, India. Arab J Geosci 9, 90 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12517-015-2046-6

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Keywords

  • Flood
  • Flood risk management
  • Flood climate
  • Gumbel distribution
  • Log Pearson type III distribution
  • DVC