Profiling public transport users through perceptions about public transport providers and satisfaction with the public transport service

Abstract

Priority has been given to increasing public transport use in the mobility programmes of developed countries as part of a global strategy to manage traffic congestion and air pollution in urban areas. Understanding citizens’ travelling behaviour, their perceptions and satisfaction after experiencing public transport services is crucial to the delineation of efficient future mobility programmes. In this paper we apply cluster analysis to segment public transport users in a Portuguese urban area according to their perceptions of public transport operators and satisfaction with the public transport service. The outcomes reveal four segments of public transport users: one positive, one indifferent and the other two negative. Managerial implications of the findings are discussed.

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Acknowledgments

This article is part of the project Estudo de Satisfação dos Utilizadores dos Transportes Públicos da Área Metropolitana de Lisboa 2013, a joint project of Metropolitan Transport Authority of Lisbon (AMTL) and Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL).

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Correspondence to Paula Vicente.

Appendix

Appendix

See Tables 6 and 7.

Table 6 Descriptive statistics of operators’ image items
Table 7 Descriptive statistics of service quality items

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Vicente, P., Reis, E. Profiling public transport users through perceptions about public transport providers and satisfaction with the public transport service. Public Transp 8, 387–403 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12469-016-0141-z

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Keywords

  • Public Transport
  • Travel Behaviour
  • Regular User
  • Public Transport System
  • Environmental Commitment