Contemporary Jewry

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 99–123 | Cite as

Millennial Children of Intermarriage: Religious Upbringing, Identification, and Behavior Among Children of Jewish and Non-Jewish Parents

  • Theodore Sasson
  • Janet Krasner Aronson
  • Fern Chertok
  • Charles Kadushin
  • Leonard Saxe
Article

Abstract

The study examines changes in religious upbringing, identification, and behavior among children of intermarriage across three generations. Drawing on data from the 2013 Pew Research Center’s survey of Jewish Americans, we show that children of marriages between Jews and non-Jews in the Millennial generation are more likely than older counterparts to have been raised Jewish and to have received a formal Jewish education. Further, as a result of more widespread Jewish upbringing and education, they are more likely to identify as Jewish in adulthood and practice some aspects of Judaism. We attribute these developments primarily to the more welcoming and inclusive attitudes and practices toward intermarried families by Jewish organizations during the 1980s and 1990s. We discuss the study’s implications for Jewish demographic continuity and for the study of the dynamic interplay between intermarriage and religious affiliation.

Keywords

Intermarriage Jewish identity Millennials 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theodore Sasson
    • 1
  • Janet Krasner Aronson
    • 2
  • Fern Chertok
    • 2
  • Charles Kadushin
    • 2
  • Leonard Saxe
    • 2
  1. 1.Middlebury CollegeMiddleburyUSA
  2. 2.Brandeis UniversityWalthamUSA

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