International Journal of Social Robotics

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 291–308 | Cite as

Social Robots for Long-Term Interaction: A Survey

Survey

Abstract

As the field of HRI evolves, it is important to understand how users interact with robots over long periods. This paper reviews the current research on long-term interaction between users and social robots. We describe the main features of these robots and highlight the main findings of the existing long-term studies. We also present a set of directions for future research and discuss some open issues that should be addressed in this field.

Keywords

Human-robot interaction Social robots Long-term interaction Longitudinal studies 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.INESC-ID and ISTTechnical University of LisbonPorto SalvoPortugal

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