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The micronutrient content of traditional Greek foods

Review

Abstract

In the context of the EURRECA project (EURopean micronutrient RECommendations Aligned), we have estimated the micronutrient content of traditional Greek foods in relation to international recommendations. Many of these foods showed a rich micronutrient profile and a file was developed listing a total of 137 traditional Greek foods and dishes. This work indicates that in order to meet micronutrient requirements, a simple solution would be to adhere to traditional dietary patterns, at least for the Mediterranean populations, and reinstate traditional foods into the daily diet.

Keywords

Traditional foods Micronutrients Recommended Dietary Allowance 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, School of MedicineNational and Kapodistrian University of AthensAthensGreece

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