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Long bone nonunions treated with autologous concentrated bone marrow-derived cells combined with dried bone allograft

Abstract

Introduction

Nowadays the treatment of long bone nonunion continues to be one of the most complex and debated topics due to the large number of failures. For several years, in the relevant literature three factors have been considered essential in the healing process: growth factors and hormones, osteoprogenitor cells (mesenchymal stem cells), and extracellular matrix. The mechanical stability of the fracture site is considered the fourth element of the “Diamond concept theory.” The aim of our study was to evaluate the validity of biological adjuvants of mechanical synthesis allowing a faster healing process of nonunions.

Materials and Methods

We dealt with 19 patients with long bone nonunion. All patients have been treated with concentrated mesenchymal stem cells without bone autologous transplant. We used the Extracell BMC-marrow aspirate protocol of Regen Lab. The radiographic parameters taken into account for the diagnosis of successful healing were the presence of a bridge callus, obliteration of the fracture line and bone cortical continuity. Clinically, the pain was investigated with VAS score (visual analogue scale), where zero means no pain and 10 the worst possible pain.

Results

Radiographic investigation shows complete healing in 78.9 % (15 cases) with an average time to healing of 6.5 months (minimum healing time 80 days) corresponding also in complete remission of clinical symptoms.

Conclusion

The use of growth factors and autologous mesenchymal stem cells through the enforcement of system for tissue regeneration is a valid and innovative biotechnology technique for the treatment long bone nonunions.

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The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Correspondence to M. Scaglione.

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Scaglione, M., Fabbri, L., Dell’Omo, D. et al. Long bone nonunions treated with autologous concentrated bone marrow-derived cells combined with dried bone allograft. Musculoskelet Surg 98, 101–106 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12306-013-0271-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12306-013-0271-2

Keywords

  • Long bone nonunions
  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • Dried bone allograft
  • Pseudoarthrosis