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Investigations on diverse sesame (S. indicum L.) germplasm and its wild allies reveal wide variation in antioxidant potential

Abstract

Free radicals, the key mediators of a range of oxidative reactions involved in lipid oxidation are responsible for food quality deterioration leading to several health hazards. Antioxidants synthesized naturally or synthetically are capable of preventing oxidation of lipids and other related compounds. However, natural antioxidants have many benefits over synthetic ones. Sesame seeds contain large amount of natural bioactive components with high antioxidant potential. In the present study, 14 accessions of sesame containing wild species and cultivars were investigated. The antioxidant potential of sesame seed meal extract was evaluated by total phenolic content (TPC) method using Folin–Ciocalteu reagent, linoleic acid peroxidation by Ferric thiocyanate method, and free radical scavenging assay with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical. S. laciniatum showed highest mean values for total polyphenol content with maximum % inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation on 10th day of course of the reaction span and highest antioxidant scavenging power. S. indicum subsp. malabaricum and S. radiatum also showed high total phenol content and radical scavenging capacity. Among the Sesamum indicum cultivars, Gujarat til 2 showed high TPC and high radical scavenging activity. Higher antioxidant property of Sesamum species in comparison to sesame cultivars highlights the need to utilize the wild genepool for the improvement of cultigens for enhanced nutraceutical value.

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Acknowledgements

Authors are grateful to Head, Department of Botany, Delhi University for the support and encouragement. R&D grant by Delhi University is also gratefully acknowledged.

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Correspondence to Suman Lakhanpaul.

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Pathak, N., Verma, N., Singh, A. et al. Investigations on diverse sesame (S. indicum L.) germplasm and its wild allies reveal wide variation in antioxidant potential. Physiol Mol Biol Plants 26, 697–704 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12298-020-00784-4

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Keywords

  • Antioxidants
  • Phenolics
  • Sesame species
  • Free radicals
  • Lipid peroxidation