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Identification of salt-responsive genes from C4 halophyte Suaeda nudiflora through suppression subtractive hybridization and expression analysis under individual and combined treatment of salt and elevated carbon dioxide conditions

Abstract

Salinization of soil is a prime abiotic stress that limits agriculture productivity worldwide. To Study the mechanisms that halophytes take up to survive under high salt condition is important in engineering salinity stress tolerance in sensitive species. Suaeda nudiflora is a halophyte plant that grows in the saline environment and extreme high tidal belt. The species have high capability to produce high protein biomass in salty soils due to C4 photosynthesis. The physiological and biochemical changes in S. nudiflora under salinity stress were studied by measuring chlorophyll content, electrolytic leakage, level of lipid peroxidation and total soluble sugars. Increased lipid peroxidation and electrolytic leakage was observed in salt stressed S. nudiflora compared to control plants. A suppression subtractive hybridization strategy was employed to identify differentially expressed genes under salt treatment in S. nudiflora. A total of 333 positive clones were identified and screened. Of these, 250 expressed sequence tags were identified. cDNA subtraction library resulted in 33 contigs and 138 singletons. The functional annotation and metabolic pathways identification were performed using the Blast2GO program. In addition, we analyzed the expression patterns of 18 genes associated with salt stress-responsive pathways by semi-quantitative PCR under salt and elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) conditions. Several of the analyzed genes showed an increase in expression levels under different time points of salt treatment and at different concentrations of salt. When the same genes were studied for its expression under elevated CO2 concentrations, most of the known salt responsive genes showed higher expression under the combined treatment of elevated CO2 concentrations (500 ppm) and NaCl treatment (200 mM) compare to ambient condition. This implies that salt responsive genes are enhanced at elevated CO2 concentrations.

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Correspondence to Suja George.

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Jothiramshekar, S., Benjamin, J.J., Krishnasamy, R. et al. Identification of salt-responsive genes from C4 halophyte Suaeda nudiflora through suppression subtractive hybridization and expression analysis under individual and combined treatment of salt and elevated carbon dioxide conditions. Physiol Mol Biol Plants 26, 163–172 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12298-019-00722-z

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Keywords

  • Suaeda nudiflora
  • C4 photosynthesis
  • Suppression subtractive hybridization
  • Semi quantitative PCR
  • Salt and elevated carbon dioxide conditions