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Leaf photosynthesis and antioxidant response in selected traditional rice landraces of Jeypore tract of Odisha, India to submergence

Abstract

Submergence tolerance in rice is important for improving yield under rain-fed lowland rice ecosystem. In this study, five traditional rice landraces having submergence tolerance phenotype were selected. These five rice landraces were chosen based on the submergence-tolerance screening of 88 rice landraces from various lowland areas of Jeypore tract of Odisha in our previous study. These five rice landraces were further used for detailed physiological assessment under control, submergence and subsequent re-aeration to judge their performance under different duration of submergence. Seedling survival was significantly decreased with the increase of plant height and significant varietal difference was observed after 14 days of complete submergence. Results showed that submergence progressively declined the leaf photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, instantaneous water use efficiency, carboxylation efficiency, photosystem II (PSII) activity and chlorophyll, with greater effect observed in susceptible check variety (IR 42). Notably, higher activities of antioxidative enzymes and ascorbate level were observed in traditional rice landraces and were found comparable with the tolerant check variety (FR 13A). Taken together, three landraces such as Samudrabali, Basnamundi and Gadaba showed better photosynthetic activity than that of tolerant check variety (FR 13A) and showed superior antioxidant response to submergence and subsequent re-aeration. These landraces can be considered as potential donors for the future submergence tolerance breeding program.

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Acknowledgements

Authors are grateful to the Head, Department of Biodiversity and Conservation of Natural Resources for providing necessary facilities for the work and also grateful to University Grant Commission (UGC), New Delhi, India for providing Non-NET Fellowship.

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JB and DP designed the experiments, cultivated the plants and performed the measurement of morphological traits. JB and SKM performed the measurement of morphological and biochemical traits. SKL and DP analyzed the data and wrote the paper. All authors read and provided helpful discussions for the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Debabrata Panda.

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12298_2019_671_MOESM1_ESM.jpg

Experimental set up (A) plants grown on control condition, (B) submergence treatment in the concrete tank and (C) plants before and after 14 days of submergence treatment

12298_2019_671_MOESM2_ESM.docx

Plant height and survival due to different days of submergence. Data are mean of three replication with bar representing standard deviation (n = 3). Same letter is not significant difference at P < 0.05. C: control; dS: days after submergence

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Barik, J., Panda, D., Mohanty, S.K. et al. Leaf photosynthesis and antioxidant response in selected traditional rice landraces of Jeypore tract of Odisha, India to submergence. Physiol Mol Biol Plants 25, 847–863 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12298-019-00671-7

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Keywords

  • Antioxidant
  • Gas exchange
  • Traditional rice
  • Photosynthesis
  • PSII activity
  • Submergence