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Transcriptomic analysis of differentially expressed genes in flower-buds of genetic male sterile and wild type cucumber by RNA sequencing

Abstract

Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) pollen development involves a diverse range of gene interactions between sporophytic and gametophytic tissues. Previous studies in our laboratory showed that male sterility was controlled by a single recessive nuclear gene, and occurred in pollen mother cell meiophase. To fully explore the global gene expression and identify genes related to male sterility, a RNA-seq analysis was adopted in this study. Young male flower-buds (1–2 mm in length) from genetic male sterility (GMS) mutant and homozygous fertile cucumber (WT) were collected for two sequencing libraries. Total 545 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including 142 up-regulated DEGs and 403 down-regulated DEGs, were detected in two libraries (Fold Change ≥ 2, FDR < 0.01). These genes were involved in a variety of metabolic pathways, like ethylene-activated signaling pathway, sporopollenin biosynthetic pathway, cell cycle and DNA damage repair pathway. qRT-PCR analysis was performed and showed that the correlation between RNA-Seq and qRT-PCR was 0.876. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism that leads to GMS in cucumber.

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Acknowledgements

This work was financed by The National Key Research and Development Program of China (2016YFD0101705), the Tianjin Natural Science Foundation Key Program of China (14JCZDJC33900), and Innovation Team of Tianjin Vegetables Research System (ITTVRS) 201701.

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Correspondence to Shengli Du.

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Han, Y., Wang, X., Zhao, F. et al. Transcriptomic analysis of differentially expressed genes in flower-buds of genetic male sterile and wild type cucumber by RNA sequencing. Physiol Mol Biol Plants 24, 359–367 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12298-018-0515-6

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Keywords

  • Transcriptomics
  • RNA-seq
  • Genetic male sterility
  • Cucumber