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Increased rate of drying reduces metabolic inequity and critical water content in radicles of Cicer arietinum L.

Abstract

Orthodox seed serves as easily accessible model to study desiccation-sensitivity in plant tissues because once they undergo germination, they become sensitive to desiccation imposed injuries. In the proposed study, effects of rate of drying on the viability, electrolyte leakage, superoxide accumulation, lipid-protein oxidation and antioxidant enzymes were explored in excised radicles of Cicer arietinum L. under dehydration and wet storage. For both the drying conditions, desiccation could be explained by exponential and inverse functions. Under rapid drying tissue viability as scored by germination efficiency and tetrazolium staining remained 100 % all through the analysis (24 h) but declined remarkably after 0.30 g g−1 fresh mass water content (4 days) under slow drying. Moreover, precipitous fall in tissue viability was observed after 2 weeks of wet storage. Rapid drying was also accompanied with limited amounts of electrolyte leakage, superoxide radical, malondialdehyde and protein hydroperoxide, together with enhanced level of protein. Additionally, activities of both superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase were increased in rapidly dried radicles, but guaiacol peroxidase was declined. In contrary, above referred biomarkers were observed to perform either inversely or poorly during slow drying and wet storage suggesting that above documented alterations might be the resultant of ageing and not desiccation. Gathered data demonstrated that increased drying lowers the critical water content for tissue survival and also reduces the risk of damage resulting from aqueous-based deleterious reactions. Additionally, it also showed that growing radicles are a popular model to explore desiccation-sensitivity in plant tissues and/or seeds.

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Acknowledgments

The authors gratefully acknowledge financial assistance awarded to Jipsi Chandra by Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur (Research Fellowship No. 79/8/Fin.Sch/2014, dated 16.04.14). Authors are also grateful to Department of Science and Technology, New Delhi for providing financial support under DST-FIST scheme (Sanction No. 2384/IFD/2014-15, dated 31.07.2014).

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Correspondence to S. Keshavkant.

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Chandra, J., Tandon, M. & Keshavkant, S. Increased rate of drying reduces metabolic inequity and critical water content in radicles of Cicer arietinum L.. Physiol Mol Biol Plants 21, 215–223 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12298-015-0294-2

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Keywords

  • Antioxidants
  • Cicer arietinum L
  • Desiccation sensitivity
  • Lipid peroxidation
  • Reactive oxygen species
  • Water content