Cross-genera amplification of informative microsatellite markers from common bean and lentil for the assessment of genetic diversity in pigeonpea

Abstract

A total of 24 pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L. Millspaugh) cultivars representing different maturity groups were evaluated for genetic diversity analysis using 10 pigeonpea specific and 66 cross-genera microsatellite markers. Of the cross-genera microsatellite markers, only 12 showed amplification. A total of 45 alleles were amplified by the 22 markers. Nine markers showed 100 % polymorphism. Markers Lc 14, BMd 48 and CCB 9 amplified maximum number (5) of alleles each. One genotype specific unique band in Pusa 9 was generated by markers CCB 8. Maximum genetic diversity (74 %) was observed between cultivars MA 3 and CO 6, while the minimum diversity (12 %) was observed between NDA 1 and DA 11. The average diversity among the cultivars was estimated to be 45.6 %. SSR primers from pigeonpea were found to be more polymorphic (37 %) as compared to common bean and lentil markers. The arithmetic mean heterozygosity (Hav) and marker index (MI) were found to be 0.014 and 0.03, respectively, indicating the potential of common bean and lentil microsatellite markers for genetic mapping, diversity analysis and genotyping in Cajanus.

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Correspondence to Subhojit Datta.

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Datta, S., Mahfooz, S., Singh, P. et al. Cross-genera amplification of informative microsatellite markers from common bean and lentil for the assessment of genetic diversity in pigeonpea. Physiol Mol Biol Plants 16, 123–134 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12298-010-0014-x

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Keywords

  • Genetic diversity
  • pigeonpea
  • microsatellite
  • polymorphism
  • transferability