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Whether western normative laboratory values used for clinical diagnosis are applicable to Indian population? An overview on reference interval

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Abstract

Reference Intervals denote normative values related to laboratory parameters/analytes used by diagnostic centers for clinical diagnosis. International guidelines recommend that every country must establish reference intervals for healthy individuals belonging to a group of homogeneous population. Considering enormous racial and ethnic diversity of Indian population, it is mandatory to establish reference intervals specific to Indian population. The overview on reference interval describes why the national organizations in India need to initiate nationwide efforts to establish its own laboratory standards for apparently healthy reference individuals belonging to our polygenetic, polyethnic, polyracial, multilinguistic and multicultural predominantly rural and appreciable urban Indian population with varied dietary habits.

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Malati, T. Whether western normative laboratory values used for clinical diagnosis are applicable to Indian population? An overview on reference interval. Indian J Clin Biochem 24, 111–122 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12291-009-0022-1

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