Antimicrobial activity of enterocins from Enterococcus faecalis SL-5 against Propionibacterium acnes, the causative agent in acne vulgaris, and its therapeutic effect

Abstract

A lactic acid bacterial strain was isolated from human fecal specimen and identified as Enterococcus faecalis SL-5. The isolated strain showed antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive pathogens assayed, especially the highest activity against Propionibacterium acnes. The antimicrobial substance was purified and verified as a bacteriocin (named ESL5) of E. faecalis SL-5 by activity-staining using P. acnes as an indicator. N-terminal sequence of ESL5 was determined (MGAIAKLVAK) and sequence analysis revealed that it is almost identical to the some of enterocins including L50A/B of E. faecium L50 and MR10A/B of E. faecalis MRR 10-3. From the sequencing data of L50A/B structural genes, the nucleotide sequence showed 100% identity with that of the MR10A/B structural genes, implying that ESL5 is an equivalent of enterocin MR10. Meanwhile, we also tested the therapeutic effect of anti-P. acnes activity in patients with mild to moderate acne because of its pathogenic role to acne vulgaris. For this purpose, a concentrated powder of CBT SL-5 was prepared using cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS) of E. faecalis SL-5 and included in a lotion for application in the patients. The study showed that CBT SL-5 lotion significantly reduced the inflammatory lesions like pustules compared to the placebo lotion. Therefore our results indicate that the anti-P. acnes activity produced by E. faecalis SL-5 has potential role to the treatment of acne as an alternative to topical antibiotics.

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Correspondence to Young Min Park.

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Kang, B.S., Seo, J., Lee, G. et al. Antimicrobial activity of enterocins from Enterococcus faecalis SL-5 against Propionibacterium acnes, the causative agent in acne vulgaris, and its therapeutic effect. J Microbiol. 47, 101–109 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12275-008-0179-y

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Keywords

  • acne vulgaris
  • antimicrobial activity
  • cell-free culture supernatant