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Scavenging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with nanomaterials

Abstract

Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are essential for normal physiological processes and play important roles in cell signaling, immunity, and tissue homeostasis. However, excess radical species are implicated in the development and augmented pathogenesis of various diseases. Several antioxidants may restore the chemical balance, but their use is limited by disappointing results of clinical trials. Nanoparticles are an attractive therapeutic alternative because they can change the biodistribution profile of antioxidants, and possess intrinsic ability to scavenge RONS. Herein, we review the types of RONS, how they are implicated in several diseases, and the types of nanoparticles with inherent antioxidant capability, their mechanisms of action, and their biological applications.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported, in part, by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the National Institutes of Health (No. NIBIB/NCI P30CA014520) and the Brazilian Science without Borders Program (No. SwB-CNPq).

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Ferreira, C.A., Ni, D., Rosenkrans, Z.T. et al. Scavenging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with nanomaterials. Nano Res. 11, 4955–4984 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12274-018-2092-y

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Keywords

  • mnanomaterials
  • reactive oxygen species (ROS)
  • reactive nitrogen species
  • ROS scavenging
  • antioxidant nanoparticles