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A study on terraced apartments and their natural ventilation performance in hot and humid regions

Abstract

Terraced apartments as a typology of the buildings are new approaches to meet energy conservation targets. This principle in the form of interactive spaces contributes to an incorporation of interior and exterior, daylight addition and exploitation of natural ventilation. This study mainly investigates the natural ventilation exploitation of a terraced apartment in the hot and humid region. One solid block and 4 porous apartments with different terrace depths (TD) are evaluated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The k-ε turbulence model was adapted to simulate airflow in and around a mid-rise building with 42 residential blocks. CFD analysis compares the effect of permeability in the form of terraces on wind behaviour and natural ventilation efficiency in a mid-rise building. Ventilation assessment parameters such as mean air velocity and mean age of air are measured to compare the natural ventilation performance. The simulation results clearly indicate that the implementation of permeability in the form of terraces can enhance building natural ventilation performance significantly. However, it is proved that some physical configurations such as terrace depth can influence this performance greatly. According to the results, increasing the terrace depth up to 1.2 meters will enhance the mean wind velocity 40%–88% inside the room, 10.61%–12.29% near the window and 63.44% on the openings. Velocity diagram follows a descending process after TD 1.2. The mean wind speed decreases to 25.53% inside the room, 15.09% inside terraces and 1.09% near the window. The average wind velocity on the openings is revealed to be 1.54 to 1.64 times larger in the porous models than the solid one. On the other hand, porous cases indicate lower values for the mean age of air compared to the solid model. This study provides proper guidelines to predict ventilation performance and to improve the design of naturally ventilated mid-rise buildings in hot and humid regions.

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Acknowledgements

This paper is part of PhD thesis entitled “Porous Architecture Towards Energy Efficient Buildings (Concept of Porosity for Enhancing Naturally Ventilated Mid-rise Buildings in Hot and Humid Regions)” conducted by the first author at Tarbiat Modares University under the supervision of the second author, and partially done at Aarhus University under the supervision of third author.

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Correspondence to Mohammadjavad Mahdavinejad.

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Saadatjoo, P., Mahdavinejad, M. & Zhang, G. A study on terraced apartments and their natural ventilation performance in hot and humid regions. Build. Simul. 11, 359–372 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12273-017-0407-7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12273-017-0407-7

Keywords

  • natural ventilation
  • terraced apartment
  • CFD
  • wind
  • building