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Wenn Viren Viren infizieren

Abstract

Virophages are a new type of satellite viruses that infect giant DNA viruses of the Mimiviridae family. Inside the shared eukaryotic host cell, virophages replicate in the cytoplasmic virion factories of their host viruses. This causes a decreased production of giant virus particles and an increased host cell survival rate. Giant viruses and virophages are embedded in a network of genetic interactions that includes transposable DNA elements, plasmids, and integrated forms of virophage genomes.

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Correspondence to Matthias G. Fischer.

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Matthias Fischer 1997–2003 Biochemiestudium an der Universität Bayreuth. 2004–2011 Promotion an der University of British Columbia, Kanada. Seit 2011 Postdoktorand am Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung in Heidelberg.

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Fischer, M.G. Wenn Viren Viren infizieren. Biospektrum 19, 619–621 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12268-013-0362-5

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