Advertisement

BIOspektrum

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 15–18 | Cite as

Das Corticotropin-Releasing-Hormon-System und die Angst

  • Damian Refojo
  • Jan M. DeussingEmail author
Wissenschaft Molekulare Medizin
  • 81 Downloads

Abstract

The corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and its receptors coordinate the body’s stress response. A dysregulation of this system plays a role in the development of psychiatric diseases such as depression and anxiety. The selective deletion of CRH receptor type 1 (CRHR1) in neurons of a specific neurotransmitter identity suggests that an imbalance between CRHR1-controlled anxiogenic glutamatergic and anxiolytic dopaminergic circuits might be causally involved in emotional disorders.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literatur

  1. [1]
    Vale W, Spiess J, Rivier C et al. (1981) Characterization of a 41-residue ovine hypothalamic peptide that stimulates secretion of corticotropin and beta-endorphin. Science 213:1394–1397PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    Gallagher JP, Orozco-Cabal LF, Liu J et al. (2008) Synaptic physiology of central CRH system. Eur J Pharmacol 583:215–225PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    Holsboer F (1999) The rationale for corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor (CRH-R) antagonists to treat depression and anxiety. J Psychiatr Res 33:181–214PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    Lu A, Steiner MA, Whittle N et al. (2008) Conditional mouse mutants highlight mechanisms of corticotropin-releasing hormone effects on stress-coping behavior. Mol Psychiatry 13:1028–1042PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. [5]
    Kimura M, Müller-Preuss P, Lu A et al. (2009) Conditional corticotropin-releasing hormone overexpression in the mouse forebrain enhances rapid eye movement sleep. Mol Psychiatry 15:154–165PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. [6]
    Refojo D, Schweizer M, Kuehne C et al. (2011) Glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurons mediate anxiogenic and anxiolytic effects of CRHR1. Science 333:1903–1907PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. [7]
    Timpl P, Spanagel R, Sillaber I et al. (1998) Impaired stress response and reduced anxiety in mice lacking a functional corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1. Nat Genet 19:162–166PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. [8]
    Müller MB, Zimmermann S, Sillaber I et al. (2003) Limbic corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 mediates anxiety-related behavior and hormonal adaptation to stress. Nat Neurosci 6:1100–1107PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. [9]
    Binneman B, Feltner D, Kolluri S et al. (2008) A 6-week randomized, placebo-controlled trial of CP-316,311 (a selective CRH1 antagonist) in the treatment of major depression. Am J Psychiatry 165:617–620PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. [10]
    Zobel AW, Nickel T, Künzel HE et al. (2000) Effects of the high-affinity corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 antagonist R121919 in major depression: the first 20 patients treated. J Psychiatr Res 34:171–181PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. [11]
    Holsboer F, Ising M (2010) Stress hormone regulation: biological role and translation into therapy. Annu Rev Psychol 61:81–109PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. [12]
    Arzt A, Holsboer F (2006) CRF signaling: molecular specificity for drug targeting in the CNS. Trends Pharmacol Sci 27:531–538PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut Für PsychiatrieMünchenGermany
  2. 2.Molekulare NeurogenetikMax-Planck-Institut für PsychiatrieMünchenGermany

Personalised recommendations