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Key Roles of RGD-Recognizing Integrins During Cardiac Development, on Cardiac Cells, and After Myocardial Infarction

Abstract

Cardiac cells interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins through integrin mechanoreceptors that control many cellular events such as cell survival, apoptosis, differentiation, migration, and proliferation. Integrins play a crucial role in cardiac development as well as in cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy. Integrins recognize oligopeptides present on ECM proteins and are involved in three main types of interaction, namely with collagen, laminin, and the oligopeptide RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) present on vitronectin and fibronectin proteins. To date, the specific role of integrins recognizing the RGD has not been addressed. In this review, we examine their role during cardiac development, their role on cardiac cells, and their upregulation during pathological processes such as heart fibrosis and hypertrophy. We also examine their role in regenerative and angiogenic processes after myocardial infarction (MI) in the peri-infarct area. Specific targeting of these integrins may be a way of controlling some of these pathological events and thereby improving medical outcomes.

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O.S. decided on content and wrote the original draft of the manuscript. Y.L. collaborated in writing and revising the manuscript. J.C and M.A. revised the manuscript and approved the final version. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.

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Schussler, O., Chachques, J.C., Alifano, M. et al. Key Roles of RGD-Recognizing Integrins During Cardiac Development, on Cardiac Cells, and After Myocardial Infarction. J. of Cardiovasc. Trans. Res. (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12265-021-10154-4

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Keywords

  • Integrins
  • RGD
  • Adhesion molecules
  • Contractility
  • Collagen
  • Myocardial infarct