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Neuroscience Bulletin

, Volume 35, Issue 2, pp 225–228 | Cite as

Comparison of Reference Genes for Transcriptional Studies in Postmortem Human Brain Tissue Under Different Conditions

  • Qing Zhang
  • Hanlin Zhang
  • Fan Liu
  • Qian Yang
  • Kang Chen
  • Pan Liu
  • Tianyi Sun
  • Chao Ma
  • Wenying Qiu
  • Xiaojing QianEmail author
Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor

Research on neurodegenerative diseases is a hot topic worldwide [1], and MRI, genetics and epigenetics, and animal models have been commonly used. Considering species differences, research on human brain samples is irreplaceable [2]. Many countries and regions have built brain banks to collect and store brain tissue from donors.

Samples provided by a brain bank can be used to study synaptic structure, protein, DNA, RNA [3, 4], and lipids to illuminate the pathological mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative diseases. When brain tissue is used for gene expression research, the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is an accurate method, which simultaneously amplifies and quantifies the expression of target genes by measuring the intensity of fluorescence in each PCR cycle; it has the advantages of high efficiency, sensitivity, accuracy, and specificity, along with low cost [5]. However, the value of the PCR cycle threshold requires accurate...

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81271239, 81771205, and 91632113), the Natural Science Foundation and Major Basic Research Program of Shanghai Municipality, China (16JC1420500 and 16JC1420502), and the CAMS Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences (2017-I2M-3-008). This work was also sponsored by the China Human Brain Bank Consortium.

Conflict of interest

There are no potential conflicts in the financial and material support for this research.

Supplementary material

12264_2018_309_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (70 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 70 kb)

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Copyright information

© Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, CAS and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qing Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hanlin Zhang
    • 2
    • 3
  • Fan Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qian Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kang Chen
    • 2
    • 3
  • Pan Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tianyi Sun
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chao Ma
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wenying Qiu
    • 1
  • Xiaojing Qian
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Human Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, Institute of Basic Medical SciencesChinese Academy of Medical SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.Joint Laboratory of Anesthesia and Pain, Peking Union Medical CollegeChinese Academy of Medical SciencesBeijingChina
  3. 3.Eight-Year MD ProgramPeking Union Medical CollegeBeijingChina

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