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Virologica Sinica

, Volume 33, Issue 5, pp 394–401 | Cite as

The Distribution of Different Clades of Seneca Valley Viruses in Guangdong Province, China

  • Pan Chen
  • Fan Yang
  • Weijun Cao
  • Huanan Liu
  • Keshan Zhang
  • Xiangtao Liu
  • Zhiwen Xu
  • Zixiang Zhu
  • Haixue Zheng
Research Article

Abstract

Seneca Valley virus (SVV), a newly determined etiological agent of vesicular disease in swine, causes porcine idiopathic disease and occasional acute death in piglets. Recently, an increased number of SVV infection cases have been reported in the United States (US) and China, resulting in significant economic losses to the swine industry. The first identification of SVV in China was reported in Guangdong Province, a major swine producing province. The cases of SVV were continuously reported in Guangdong in 2015 and 2016. However, the spread of SVV in Guangdong in 2017 remains unknown. In this study, we determined two new SVV strains, CH-GD-2017-1 and CH-GD-2017-2, from Guangdong. The genetic analysis suggested that the two Guangdong strains showed different characteristics to previous Guangdong strains. They showed lower nucleotide similarity with strains isolated in 2015 and 2016, and were more similar to the US strains. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the new strains were clustered in a different clade with previous Guangdong strains. We found 28 mutated amino acids in the new strains, compared with the first Guangdong strain, SVV CH-01-2015. In the geographic analysis, we found that the US and China reported more SVV cases than other countries, and most of the SVV cases were reported in east and central China—of which, Guangdong Province is one of the major epidemic regions. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SVV continued to spread in Guangdong Province in 2017, and two different clades of SVVs have emerged in this region.

Keywords

Seneca Valley virus (SVV) Genomic sequence Phylogenetic tree Epidemiological analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by grants from the National Natural Sciences Foundation of China (No. U1501213), the Key Development and Research Foundation of Yunnan (2018BB004) and the Project Supported by National Science and Technology Ministry (2015BAD12B04).

Author Contributions

PC, FY, ZZ and HZ designed the research, PC, FY, ZZ, WC and HL performed the experiments. KZ and XL provided experiment support. PC, ZZ and HZ wrote the manuscript. All authors have read and approved the final manuscript for submission.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Animal and Human Rights Statement

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

Supplementary material

12250_2018_56_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (493 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 494 kb)

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Copyright information

© Wuhan Institute of Virology, CAS and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Etiological Biology, National Foot and Mouth Diseases Reference Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Animal Virology of Ministry of Agriculture, Lanzhou Veterinary Research InstituteChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesLanzhouChina
  2. 2.Animal Biotechnology Center, Key Laboratory of Animal Disease and Human Health of Sichuan ProvinceSichuan Agricultural UniversityChengduChina

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