Hepatitis C virus experimental model systems and antiviral drug research

Abstract

An estimated 130 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) making it a leading cause of liver disease worldwide. Because the currently available therapy of pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin is only effective in a subset of patients, the development of new HCV antivirals is a healthcare imperative. This review discusses the experimental models available for HCV antiviral drug research, recent advances in HCV antiviral drug development, as well as active research being pursued to facilitate development of new HCV-specific therapeutics.

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Correspondence to Susan L. Uprichard.

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Foundation items: The author was supported by National Institutes of Health grants AI070827 and CA33266, American Cancer Society grant RSG-09-076-01 and the UIC Walter Payton Center GUILD.

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Uprichard, S.L. Hepatitis C virus experimental model systems and antiviral drug research. Virol. Sin. 25, 227–245 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12250-010-3134-0

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Key words

  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Chronic liver disease
  • Experimental model systems
  • High throughput screening
  • Drug targets