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Virologica Sinica

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 146–151 | Cite as

Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay based on the nucleocapsid protein of SARS-like coronaviruses

  • Jun-fa Yuan
  • Yan Li
  • Hua-jun Zhang
  • Peng Zhou
  • Zhen-hua Ke
  • Yun-zhi Zhang
  • Zheng-li Shi
Article
  • 44 Downloads

Abstract

The nucleocapsid protein (N) is a major structural protein of coronaviruses. The N protein of bat SARS-like coronavirus (SL-CoV) has a high similarity with that of SARS-CoV. In this study, the SL-CoV N protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and used as antigen. An Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (indirect ELISA) was developed for detection of SARS- or SL-CoV infections in bat populations. The detection of 573 bat sera with this indirect ELISA demonstrated that SL-CoVs consistently circulate in Rhinilophus species, further supporting the proposal that bats are natural reservoirs of SL-CoVs. This method uses 1–2 μl of serum sample and can be used for preliminary screening of infections by SARS- or SL-CoV with a small amount of serum sample.

Key words

SARS-like CoV Nucleocapsid protein Indirect ELISA 

CLC number

Q939.4 

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Copyright information

© Wuhan Institute of Virology, CAS and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jun-fa Yuan
    • 1
  • Yan Li
    • 1
  • Hua-jun Zhang
    • 1
  • Peng Zhou
    • 1
  • Zhen-hua Ke
    • 1
  • Yun-zhi Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zheng-li Shi
    • 1
  1. 1.Wuhan Institute of VirologyChinese Academy of SciencesWuhanChina
  2. 2.Yunnan Institute of Endemic Diseases Control and PreventionDaliChina

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