The effect of antenna polarization and body morphology on the measurement uncertainty of a wearable multi-band distributed exposure meter

Abstract

This paper studies the effect of antenna polarization on measurement uncertainty of a multi-band body-worn distributed exposure meter (BWDM). The BWDM is a device for assessing electromagnetic fields in real environments accurately. The BWDM consists of 8 nodes and is calibrated on the body for simultaneous measurement of the incident power density in four frequency bands. Each node contains an antenna that can have two potential antenna polarizations.The BWDM is calibrated on four human subjects in an anechoic chamber to determine its measurement uncertainty in terms of 68% confidence interval (CI68) of the on-body antenna aperture. The results show that using a fixed polarization of the antennas on body can lead to a different CI68 up to maximum 4.9 dB when worn by another person which is still 9.6 dB lower than the measurement uncertainty of commercial exposure meters.

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Funding

This research was funded by the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO) under grant agreement no. G003415N and the French National Research Program for Environmental and Occupational Health of ANSES (2015/2 RF/07) as part of project ACCEDERA. A.T. has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement no. 665501 with the FWO. A.T. is an FWO [PEGASUS]2 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow. S.A. is a Post-Doctoral Fellow of the FWO.

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Correspondence to Reza Aminzadeh.

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Aminzadeh, R., Thielens, A., Agneessens, S. et al. The effect of antenna polarization and body morphology on the measurement uncertainty of a wearable multi-band distributed exposure meter. Ann. Telecommun. 74, 67–77 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12243-018-0691-y

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Keywords

  • RF exposure
  • Personal exposure meters
  • Polarization dependency
  • Body morphology
  • Measurement uncertainty