Oxidation kinetics of small CI engine’s biodiesel particulate matter

Abstract

Particulate matters (PMs) oxidation kinetics by Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) was successfully studied. The chemical content percentage of PM can be divided by oxidation temperature zoning in three main regions which are moisture, unburned hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon. It is clearly observed that the amount of each region is strongly depending on engine operating condition, the amount of unburned HC in low load condition of the engine load are larger than that of high load condition. The calculated apparent activation energies of biodiesel PM oxidation are lower than that of diesel PM and carbon black because of unburned oxygenated molecule. The calculated apparent activation energy of biodiesel and diesel PMs oxidize with air is in the range of 147–157 kJ/mole and 153–165 kJ/mole, respectively. The results of this research would be used as basic information for design and develop removing process of particulate matter emitted from engine combustion which using in diesel and biodiesel fuels.

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Correspondence to P. Karin.

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Karin, P., Borhanipour, M., Songsaengchan, Y. et al. Oxidation kinetics of small CI engine’s biodiesel particulate matter. Int.J Automot. Technol. 16, 211–219 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12239-015-0023-4

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Key Words

  • Diesel engine
  • Particulate matter
  • Biodiesel
  • Activation energy
  • Oxidation kinetics