International Journal of Automotive Technology

, Volume 13, Issue 6, pp 861–872

Optimization of intake port design for SI engine

  • Y. L. Qi
  • L. C. Dong
  • H. Liu
  • P. V. Puzinauskas
  • K. C. Midkiff
Article

Abstract

It is well known that in-cylinder flow is very important factor for the performance of SI engine. An appropriate in-cylinder flow pattern can enhance the turbulence intensity at spark time, therefore increasing the stability of combustion, reducing emission and improving fuel economy. In this paper, the effect of intake port design on in-cylinder flow is studied. It is found a vortex existed at the upper side of intake port of a production SI engine used in the study, during the intake stroke, which will reduce both tumble ratio and volumetric efficiency. A minor modification on intake port is made to eliminate the vortex and increase tumble ratio while keeping volumetric efficiency at the same level. It is demonstrated that the increase in tumble in the new design results in a 20 per cent increase in the fuel vaporization. In this study, both KIVA and STAR-CD are used to simulate the engine cold flow, as well as ICEM CFD and es-ice used as pre-processor respectively due to the complexity of engine geometry. Simulation results from KIVA and STAR-CD are compared and analyzed.

Key Words

SI intake port design Flow recirculation High tumble Fuel vaporization CFD KIVA STAR-CD ICEM CFD es-ice 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Automotive Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. L. Qi
    • 1
  • L. C. Dong
    • 2
  • H. Liu
    • 3
  • P. V. Puzinauskas
    • 4
  • K. C. Midkiff
    • 4
  1. 1.Caterpillar Inc.PeoriaUSA
  2. 2.School of Chemistry & Chemical EngineeringChongqing UniversityChongqingChina
  3. 3.Zhejiang Yinlun Machinery Co., Ltd.Hi-tech Industrial Development ZoneTaizhou, ZhejiangChina
  4. 4.Department of Mechanical EngineeringThe University of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA

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