Kew Bulletin

, Volume 66, Issue 1, pp 111–121 | Cite as

Four new species of Aloe (Aloaceae) from Ethiopia, with notes on the ethics of describing new taxa from foreign countries

  • Sebsebe Demissew
  • Ib Friis
  • Tesfaye Awas
  • Paul Wilkin
  • Odile Weber
  • Steve Bachman
  • Inger Nordal
Article

Summary

Subsequent to the treatment of the Aloaceae, with 38 species of Aloe, in the Flora of Ethiopia (Sebsebe Demissew & Gilbert 1997), four more species, Aloe bertemariae Sebsebe & Dioli (2000), A. friisii Sebsebe & M. G. Gilbert (2000), A. clarkei L. E. Newton (2002) and A. elkerriana Dioli & T. A. McCoy (2007) have been described from that country. Here four additional new species are described: Aloe benishangulana Sebsebe & Tesfaye from near Assosa, Benishangul-Gumuz in Welega floristic region; A. ghibensis Sebsebe & Friis from the Ghibe Gorge, Kefa floristic region; A. weloensis Sebsebe from near Dessie in Welo floristic region and A. welmelensis Sebsebe & Nordal along the Welmel River in Bale floristic region. The phytogeographical positions of the new species are assessed by comparison with the previously known species. Complications with the deposition of type material of A. clarkei and A. elkerriana is used to raise various issues regarding the ethics of describing new taxa from foreign countries.

Key Words

Aloaceae Aloe Asphodelaceae CITES Flora of Ethiopia new species phytogeography Xanthorrhoeaeeae 

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Copyright information

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sebsebe Demissew
    • 1
  • Ib Friis
    • 2
  • Tesfaye Awas
    • 3
  • Paul Wilkin
    • 4
  • Odile Weber
    • 4
  • Steve Bachman
    • 4
  • Inger Nordal
    • 5
  1. 1.National Herbarium, Science FacultyAddis Ababa UniversityAddis AbabaEthiopia
  2. 2.Botanical Garden and Museum, Natural History Museum of DenmarkUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagen KDenmark
  3. 3.Institute of Biodiversity ConservationAddis AbabaEthiopia
  4. 4.Herbarium, Library, Art and Archives, Royal Botanic Gardens, KewRichmondUK
  5. 5.Department of BiologyUniversity of OsloOsloNorway

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