Kew Bulletin

, Volume 65, Issue 4, pp 561–576 | Cite as

A global approach to crop wild relative conservation: securing the gene pool for food and agriculture

  • Nigel Maxted
  • Shelagh Kell
  • Álvaro Toledo
  • Ehsan Dulloo
  • Vernon Heywood
  • Toby Hodgkin
  • Danny Hunter
  • Luigi Guarino
  • Andy Jarvis
  • Brian Ford-Lloyd
Article

Summary

In light of the growing concern over the potentially devastating impacts on biodiversity and food security of climate change and the massively growing world population, taking action to conserve crop wild relatives (CWR), is no longer an option — it is a priority. Crop wild relatives are species closely related to crops, including their progenitors, many of which have the potential to contribute beneficial traits to crops, such as pest or disease resistance, yield improvement or stability. They are a critical component of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture (PGRFA), have already made major contributions to crop production and are vital for future food security; their systematic conservation in ways that ensure their continuing availability for use is therefore imperative. This is a complex, interdisciplinary, global issue that has been addressed by various national and international initiatives. Drawing on the lessons learnt from these initiatives we can now propose a global approach to CWR conservation, the key elements of which are: (1) estimating global CWR numbers, (2) assessment of the global importance of CWR diversity, (3) current conservation status, (4) threats to CWR diversity, (5) systematic approaches to CWR conservation, (6) CWR informatics, and (7) enhancing the use of CWR diversity.

Key Words

conservation crop diversity crop wild relatives genetic diversity plant genetic resources for food and agriculture 

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Copyright information

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nigel Maxted
    • 1
  • Shelagh Kell
    • 1
  • Álvaro Toledo
    • 2
  • Ehsan Dulloo
    • 3
  • Vernon Heywood
    • 4
  • Toby Hodgkin
    • 3
  • Danny Hunter
    • 3
  • Luigi Guarino
    • 5
  • Andy Jarvis
    • 6
  • Brian Ford-Lloyd
    • 1
  1. 1.School of BiosciencesUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamUK
  2. 2.FAO Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and AgricultureRomeItaly
  3. 3.Bioversity InternationalRomeItaly
  4. 4.School of Biological SciencesUniversity of ReadingReadingUK
  5. 5.Global Crop Diversity TrustRomeItaly
  6. 6.International Centre for Tropical Agriculture, Recta Cali-PalmiraCaliColombia

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