Folia Microbiologica

, Volume 58, Issue 4, pp 283–289 | Cite as

Effects of microbial elicitor on production of hypocrellin by Shiraia bambusicola

  • Wen Du
  • Zongqi Liang
  • Xiao Zou
  • Yanfeng Han
  • Jiandong Liang
  • Jianping Yu
  • Wanhao Chen
  • Yurong Wang
  • Chunlong Sun
Article

Abstract

Some endophyte isolates were isolated in a bamboo pole sample parasitized the fungus Shiraia bambusicola from Zhejiang Province. After screening through hypocrellin bacteriostatic effect and fermentation test, we got the isolate TX4 of bacterial elicitor and GZUIFR-TT1 of fungal elicitor which had certain effect to promote S. bambusicola to produce hypocrellin. The Plackett–Burman design was introduced to evaluate the effects of nine factors based on single-factor test. Yeast extract, glucose, and isolate GZUIFR-TT1 elicitor were found to be the critical activity factors for increasing the total hypocrellin production. So we identified the isolate GZUIFR-TT1 as Trametes sp. Through response surface methodology, we obtained the optimum production conditions as follows: yeast extract, 2.99 g/L; glucose, 32.45 g/L; and Trametes sp. elicitor, 81.40 μg/mL. Under the above conditions, the experimental value of hypocrellin production was 102.60 mg/L, compared with the control it increased about 7.90 times.

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Copyright information

© Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wen Du
    • 1
  • Zongqi Liang
    • 1
  • Xiao Zou
    • 1
  • Yanfeng Han
    • 1
  • Jiandong Liang
    • 1
  • Jianping Yu
    • 2
  • Wanhao Chen
    • 1
  • Yurong Wang
    • 2
  • Chunlong Sun
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Fungus ResourcesGuizhou UniversityGuiyangChina
  2. 2.Institute of Biochemistry and NutritionGuizhou UniversityGuiyangChina

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