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Journal of Mechanical Science and Technology

, Volume 31, Issue 4, pp 1979–1986 | Cite as

Feasibility of a new non-edible feedstock in diesel engine: Investigation of performance, emission and combustion characteristics

Article

Abstract

The amount of pressure on the automotive industry, competition facing from other automotive manufacturers, or the rules and regulations imposed by administrative bodies, biodiesel is turning out as a favourite alternative for almost all-ongoing research in the area. In the present experimental study, aamla biodiesel is used in different volumetric ratios of 25 % (B25), 50 % (B50) 75 % (B75) and 100 % (B100) as a fuel in Compression-ignition (CI) engine. This paper presents the study of performance, emission and combustion characteristics of aamla biodiesel. Aamla biodiesel is a new non-edible feedstock for diesel engine. The experimental result shows that HRR and cylinder pressure for biodiesel is found to be less than diesel. In terms of performance, B25 shows the best results as compared to other blends. As biodiesel content increases in fuel, exhaust emission decreases. According to environmental aspects, biodiesel used as a fuel in a diesel engine is quite advantageous.

Keywords

Biodiesel Combustion Diesel engine Emissions Performance 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringNational Institute of TechnologyHamirpurIndia

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