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Journal of Mechanical Science and Technology

, Volume 30, Issue 12, pp 5771–5779 | Cite as

Explosion characteristics of combustible wood dust in confined system: Analysis using oxygen consumption energy

  • Yun Seok Kim
  • Min Chul Lee
  • Dong Ho RieEmail author
Article
  • 154 Downloads

Abstract

The explosion characteristics, such as maximum explosion pressure, rate of explosion pressure rise, explosion efficiency, were investigated to determine the roll and significance of oxygen consumption energy in dust explosion. Dust explosion experiments were conducted in a Siwek 20L spherical explosion apparatus for three wood dust samples from a wood-based panel production factory. Unlike gas explosions having maximum explosion pressure at near chemical stoichiometric concentration, both the maximum explosion pressure and the maximum rate of explosion pressure of wood dusts appeared at three times or much higher equivalence ratio. Although there were differences in particle size among tested dusts, in the case of dust of which the mean particle size was not larger than 100 µm, Pmax appeared at lower equivalent ratios when mean particle sizes were smaller and at higher equivalent ratios when mean particle sizes were relatively larger. Explosion efficiency for all dusts are around 10 %, of which the value is relatively lower than most of other normal combustion, which signifies dust explosion remains 90 % of unburned dust with high fire risks after explosion. In a dust explosion, it is difficult to estimate the weight of suspended dust participating in explosions, especially in fuel rich conditions, so a method for estimating explosion overpressure by applying oxygen consumption energy based on unit volume (1 m3, SAPT condition) was newly proposed and verified from the result of explosion efficiency. To practically apply these results to dust treating industry, the assessment procedure for dust explosion influence has been provided by introducing TNT equivalent model and its scaled distance.

Keywords

Dust explosion Oxygen consumption calories Heat of combustion Equivalent ratio TNT equivalent model 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Safety EngineeringIncheon National UniversityIncheonKorea
  2. 2.Fire Disaster Prevention Reserch CenterIncheon National UniversityIncheonKorea

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