Evaluation of cement mortar suitability for repairing concrete in hydraulic structures

Abstract

During the exploitation time of hydraulic structures, the reinforced concrete deteriorates. Therefore, it is important to repair and protect the concrete from atmospheric forces. The concrete surface that has to be repaired must be rough enough, and the repair material must have proper adhesive features so that the bond between the old concrete and repair material is strong. In the present paper, the optimal roughness index of the concrete surface was estimated for structural and non-structural repair. Moreover, the suitability of cement mortar modified with expansive admixture and fibres for the repair of hydraulic structures was evaluated. To estimate the bond strength, a pull-off test was conducted. To investigate the repair’s frost resistance, specimens were treated with 50, 100 and 150 freezing–thawing cycles, and subsequently, the pull-off bond strength was determined. It is concluded that expansive admixture and polypropylene fibres increased the cement mortar’s adhesive features as well as the roughness of the concrete surface to be repaired. It is estimated that the most suitable variant for the repair of reinforced concrete in hydraulic structures (when frost-resistant mark F100 is required) is to use cement mortar modified with expansive admixture and a properly prepared concrete surface.

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Correspondence to Rytis Skominas.

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Skominas, R., Gurskis, V., Sadzevicius, R. et al. Evaluation of cement mortar suitability for repairing concrete in hydraulic structures. KSCE J Civ Eng 21, 2814–2820 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12205-017-1066-z

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Keywords

  • concrete
  • repair
  • bond strength
  • roughness
  • shrinkage
  • frost resistance