A model for improving organizational continuity

Abstract

Regardless of organizations’ purposes, one thing is common to all: they must strive for organizational continuity. As globalization increases the exposure of organizations to various risks, many of them unknowingly leave their operations exposed to breakdown, thereby jeopardising the continuity of their organization. With the recent heightened awareness of possible crises and disasters, it is becoming increasingly important for many organizations to find good management solutions to these potentialities. Integrating known concepts like business continuity planning, crisis management, and resilience would yield better organizational continuity. It is also essential that tools be developed to enable managers to successfully manage crises and disasters. This paper addresses the issue of organizations’ fragility to crises and disasters and proposes a conceptual model designed to increase organizational robustness and, ultimately, yield better organizational continuity.

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Correspondence to Simon Véronneau.

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Véronneau, S., Cimon, Y. & Roy, J. A model for improving organizational continuity. J Transp Secur 6, 209–220 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12198-013-0112-4

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Keywords

  • Crisis Management
  • Disaster management
  • Continuity planning
  • Resilience
  • Organizational continuity