Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces

, Volume 4, Issue 3–4, pp 147–156 | Cite as

Multi-modal musical environments for mixed-reality performance

  • Robert Hamilton
  • Juan-Pablo Caceres
  • Chryssie Nanou
  • Chris Platz
Original Paper
  • 130 Downloads

Abstract

This article describes a series of multi-modal networked musical performance environments designed and implemented for concert presentation at the Torino-Milano (MiTo) Festival (Settembre musica, 2009, http://www.mitosettembremusica.it/en/home.html) between 2009 and 2010. Musical works, controlled by motion and gestures generated by in-engine performer avatars will be discussed with specific consideration given to the multi-modal presentation of mixed-reality works, combining both software-based and real-world traditional musical instruments.

Keywords

Music Virtual environments Mixed-reality Multi-modal 

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Copyright information

© OpenInterface Association 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Hamilton
    • 1
  • Juan-Pablo Caceres
    • 1
  • Chryssie Nanou
    • 1
  • Chris Platz
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA)Stanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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