International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 107, Issue 5, pp 568–577 | Cite as

Mild renal dysfunction defined by creatinine clearance rate has limited impact on clinical outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

  • Shuntaro Ikegawa
  • Ken-ichi Matsuoka
  • Tomoko Inomata
  • Naoto Ikeda
  • Hiroyuki Sugiura
  • Taiga Kuroi
  • Takeru Asano
  • Shohei Yoshida
  • Hisakazu Nishimori
  • Nobuharu Fujii
  • Eisei Kondo
  • Yoshinobu Maeda
  • Mitsune Tanimoto
Original Article
  • 59 Downloads

Abstract

Creatinine clearance rate (Ccr) is a more accurate indicator of renal function than serum creatinine. Data are sparse regarding the prognostic value of renal impairment calculated using Ccr in patients who undergo allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We performed a retrospective analysis of 185 patients who underwent allo-HSCT. These patients were divided into two groups by Ccr (ml/min) before transplantation; one showed normal renal function (Ccr ≥ 60, n = 156) and the other showed mild renal dysfunction (30 ≤ Ccr < 60, n = 29), and transplant outcomes were compared between the groups. We observed no significant difference between the groups in terms of clinical characteristics other than age, estimated glomerular filtration rate, serum creatinine, Ccr predicted by Cockcroft–Gault formula, primary disease, and conditioning intensity. With respect to transplant outcomes, no significant difference was observed in overall survival, relapse, or non-relapse mortality between the two groups. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that 30 ≤ Ccr < 60 before allo-HSCT was not an independent prognostic factor for transplant outcome. In conclusion, these results suggest that patients with mild renal dysfunction, defined as 30 ≤ Ccr < 60 ml/min, can safely undergo allo-HSCT. However, a larger series of patients is needed to evaluate the impact of mild renal dysfunction before allo-HSCT in more detail.

Keywords

Creatinine clearance rate Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation Renal dysfunction 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are very grateful to the patients in the current study. The authors would like to thank the nursing staff at our institution.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shuntaro Ikegawa
    • 1
  • Ken-ichi Matsuoka
    • 1
  • Tomoko Inomata
    • 1
  • Naoto Ikeda
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Sugiura
    • 1
  • Taiga Kuroi
    • 1
  • Takeru Asano
    • 1
  • Shohei Yoshida
    • 1
  • Hisakazu Nishimori
    • 1
  • Nobuharu Fujii
    • 1
  • Eisei Kondo
    • 1
  • Yoshinobu Maeda
    • 1
  • Mitsune Tanimoto
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Hematology and OncologyOkayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical SciencesOkayamaJapan

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