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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 105, Issue 4, pp 440–444 | Cite as

Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma in Japanese children and adolescents

  • Tomoo OsumiEmail author
  • Fumiko Tanaka
  • Tetsuya Mori
  • Reiji Fukano
  • Masahito Tsurusawa
  • Koichi Oshima
  • Atsuko Nakazawa
  • Ryoji Kobayashi
Original Article

Abstract

This is the first case series to describe primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMLBL) patients in children and adolescents in Asia. We retrospectively identified 17 PMLBL patients diagnosed between 1991 and 2014; in seven of these cases, the diagnosis was confirmed by central review, representing 1.0% of all NHL and 2.2% of all B-NHL cases registered. All patients were teenagers, including seven adolescents, with a median age of 14 years (range 12–18 years). Ten patients were male, and seven were female. The 5-year EFS and OS rates were 81.9 and 84.4%, respectively. All seven recent cases remain alive, of which three received rituximab combination therapy. Incidence, characteristics, and outcome varied considerably from those of Western populations. Further studies, including molecular analysis, are warranted.

Keywords

Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma PMLBL Children Adolescents Non-Hodgkin lymphoma 

Abbreviations

PMLBL

Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma

NHL

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

DLBCL

Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

B-NHL

B-Cell NHL

OS

Overall survival

EFS

Event-free survival

CR

Complete remission

SCT

Stem-cell transplantation

HL

Hodgkin lymphoma

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Dr. Daisuke Tomizawa of Children’s Cancer Center and Dr. Julian Tang of the Department of Education for Clinical Research, National Center for Child Health and Development, for proofreading and editing this manuscript. This research is supported by the Practical Research for Innovative Cancer Control from the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, AMED.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomoo Osumi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Fumiko Tanaka
    • 2
  • Tetsuya Mori
    • 3
  • Reiji Fukano
    • 4
  • Masahito Tsurusawa
    • 5
  • Koichi Oshima
    • 6
  • Atsuko Nakazawa
    • 7
  • Ryoji Kobayashi
    • 8
  1. 1.Children’s Cancer CenterNational Center for Child Health and DevelopmentTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsSaiseikai Yokohamashi Nanbu HospitalYokohamaJapan
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsSt. Marianna University School of MedicineKawasakiJapan
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsNational Kyushu Cancer CenterFukuokaJapan
  5. 5.Department of PediatricsAichi Medical UniversityNagakuteJapan
  6. 6.Department of PathologyKurume University School of MedicineFukuokaJapan
  7. 7.Department of PathologyNational Center for Child Health and DevelopmentTokyoJapan
  8. 8.Department of PediatricsSapporo Hokuyu HospitalSapporoJapan

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