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Exercise-Associated Muscle Cramps in the Tennis Player

Abstract

Purpose of Review

Better define the proposed etiologies, risk factors, and treatment plans for exercise-associated muscle cramps in the tennis player.

Recent Findings

While no one theory has been able to fully explain the etiology behind exercise-associated muscle cramping, further classification of acute localized cramping and systemic or recurrent cramping may help guide future treatment and prevention strategies.

Summary

Neuromuscular fatigue more than electrolyte deficit or dehydration is believed to play a large role in development of exercise-associated muscle cramps. Despite inconclusive evidence at this time, electrolyte deficit may play more of a role in the development of recurrent or systemic muscle cramping in the tennis athlete. More research is needed to better define its conclusive etiology.

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Correspondence to Neeru Jayanthi.

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Conflict of Interest

Wesley Troyer and Ally Render declare that they have no conflicts of interest. Neeru Jayanthi serves on the board of directors of Pickup Sports Foundation, Inc., Society for Tennis Medicine Science (STMS), and a volunteer on the Advisory Player Development Panel for the Woman’s Tennis Association (WTA).

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Troyer, W., Render, A. & Jayanthi, N. Exercise-Associated Muscle Cramps in the Tennis Player. Curr Rev Musculoskelet Med 13, 612–621 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12178-020-09662-8

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Keywords

  • Neuromuscular fatigue
  • Heat stress
  • Tennis cramping
  • Recovery