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Food Analytical Methods

, Volume 10, Issue 7, pp 2566–2575 | Cite as

Selective Determination of Chloramphenicol in Milk Samples by the Solid-Phase Extraction Based on Dummy Molecularly Imprinted Polymer

  • Fengnian Zhao
  • Yongxin She
  • Chao Zhang
  • Shanshan Wang
  • Xinwei Du
  • Fen Jin
  • Maojun Jin
  • Hua Shao
  • Lufei Zheng
  • Jing Wang
Article

Abstract

A novel dummy molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for selective extraction and preconcentration of chloramphenicol (CAP) has been successfully developed by precipitation polymerization using thiamphenicol (TAP) as the dummy template, methacrylic (MAA) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker, and methanol as the porogen. The performances and recognition mechanism of MIPs and non-molecularly imprinted polymers (NIPs) has evaluated in terms of adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics. The results showed that the MIPs exhibited significant specific recognition toward CAP in water with a large adsorption capacity. To test the feasibility of MIP in real samples, the obtained MIPs were applied as the selective sorbents for the solid-phase extraction of CAP from milk samples. Under optimized conditions, a rapid, convenient, and efficient method for the determination of CAP in milk samples based on MISPE coupling with high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was throughly established. The method showed excellent recoveries (96.04~108.68%) and precision (RSDs <7.97%, n = 5) for milk samples spiked at three concentration levels (2, 5, and 10 μg L−1). The results demonstrated that the CAP in milk samples could be separated and purified through molecularly imprinted solid-phased extraction (MISPE), and this method could solve the leakage of template by the employment of dummy template effectively.

Keywords

Chloramphenicol Molecularly imprinted polymers Solid-phase extraction Milk sample 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (contact no. 31471654) and the National Key Technology R&D Program for the 12th five-year plan (2014BAD13805-05). The authors would like to thank Xiaolin Cao, Guangyang Liu, and Tengfei Li at Insititute of Quality Standards and Testing Technology for Agri-Products, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences for their assistance in FTIR and adorption experiments.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Fengnian Zhao declares that she has no conflict of interest. Yongxin She declares that he has no conflict of interest. Chao Zhang declares that he has no conflict of interest. Shanshan Wang declares that she has no conflict of interest. Xinwei Du declares that she has no conflict of interest. Fen Jin declares that she has no conflict of interest. Maojun Jin declares that he has no conflict of interest. Hua Shao declares that she has no conflict of interest. Lufei Zheng declares that she has no conflict of interest. Jing Wang declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed Consent

Informed consent is not applicable in this study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fengnian Zhao
    • 1
  • Yongxin She
    • 1
  • Chao Zhang
    • 1
  • Shanshan Wang
    • 1
  • Xinwei Du
    • 2
  • Fen Jin
    • 1
  • Maojun Jin
    • 1
  • Hua Shao
    • 1
  • Lufei Zheng
    • 1
  • Jing Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory for Agro-Products Quality and Food Safety, Institute of Quality Standards and Testing Technology for Agro-ProductsChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Agricultural Information InstituteChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China

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