Advertisement

Food Analytical Methods

, Volume 9, Issue 8, pp 2299–2307 | Cite as

Determination of Biogenic Amines in Sichuan-Style Spontaneously Fermented Sausages

  • Xia Sun
  • Kang Zhou
  • Yang Gong
  • Nan Zhang
  • Min Yang
  • Dandan Qing
  • Yuewen Li
  • Junli Lu
  • Jing Li
  • Chaohui Feng
  • Cheng Li
  • Yong YangEmail author
Article

Abstract

The qualitative and quantitative profile of biogenic amines in 30 samples of Sichuan-style spontaneously fermented sausages sold in Sichuan retail markets was studied by HPLC. Tryptamine, phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, and spermidine were analyzed by UV detection after pre-column derivatization with dansyl chloride. There were wide ranges of different biogenic amines in the samples, except spermidine. The results showed that the histamine was the major biogenic amines, followed by tyramine and cadaverine, which have a mean value of 196.06 mg/kg (ranging from 114.33 to 327.35 mg/kg), 164.67 mg/kg (ranging from 88.84 to 285.89 mg/kg), and 141.65 mg/kg (ranging from 19.14 to 376.46 mg/kg), respectively. The toxicity limit of histamine is 100 mg/kg, where all of the samples exceeded this limit. None of the samples of total biogenic amines content exceeded 1000 mg/kg. The results showed that the amounts of biogenic amines in Sichuan-style spontaneously fermented sausages sold in Sichuan retail markets may pose a potential health risk for sensitive individuals. This suggested that it is necessary to improve the production techniques and the raw materials’ hygienic quality, to ensure the quality and safety of this fermented sausages with respect to their biogenic amine content.

Keywords

Biogenic amines Sichuan-style fermented sausages HPLC Physicochemical analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the project of Science and Technology Department of Sichuan Province with project code 2012NZ0001 and 2013NC0052.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

References

  1. Almeida C, Fernandes JO, Cunha SC (2012) A novel dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction (DLLME) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the determination of eighteen biogenic amines in beer. Food Control 25(1):380–388CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. An D, Chen Z, Zheng J, Chen S, Wang L, Huang Z, Weng L (2015) Determination of biogenic amines in oysters by capillary electrophoresis coupled with electrochemiluminescence. Food Chem 168:1–6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Ansorena D, Montel MC, Rokka M, Talon R, Eerola S, Rizzo A, Raemaekers M, Demeyer D (2002) Analysis of biogenic amines in northern and southern European sausages and role of flora in amine production. Meat Sci 61(2):141–147CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Arrieta MP, Prats-Moya MS (2012) Free amino acids and biogenic amines in Alicante Monastrell wines. Food Chem 135(3):1511–1519CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bover-Cid S, Izquierdo-Pulido M, Vidal-Carou MC (2001) Changes in biogenic amine and polyamine contents in slightly fermented sausages manufactured with and without sugar. Meat Sci 57(2):215–221CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bozkurt H, Erkmen O (2004) Effects of temperature, humidity and additives on the formation of biogenic amines in sucuk during ripening and storage periods. Food Sci Technol Int 10(1):21–28CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Carelli D, Centonze D, Palermo C, Quinto M, Rotunno T (2007) An interference free amperometric biosensor for the detection of biogenic amines in food products. Biosens Bioelectron 23(5):640–647CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Chong CY, Abu Bakar F, Russly AR, Jamilah B, Mahyudin NA (2011) The effects of food processing on biogenic amines formation. Int Food Res J 18(3):867–876Google Scholar
  9. Coloretti F, Chiavari C, Armaforte E, Carri S, Castagnetti GB (2008) Combined use of starter cultures and preservatives to control production of biogenic amines and improve sensorial profile in low-acid salami. J Agr Food Chem 56(23):11238–11244CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. De Borba BM, Rohrer JS (2007) Determination of biogenic amines in alcoholic beverages by ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection and integrated pulsed amperometric detection. J Chromatogr A 1155(1):22–30CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. De Mey E, De Klerck K, De Maere H, Dewulf L, Derdelinckx G, Peeters MC, Paelinck H (2014) The occurrence of N-nitrosamines, residual nitrite and biogenic amines in commercial dry fermented sausages and evaluation of their occasional relation. Meat Sci 96(2):821–828CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Dos Santos LFL, Mársico ET, Lázaro CA, Conte JCA (2015) Evaluation of biogenic amines levels, and biochemical and microbiological characterization of Italian-type salami sold in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Ital J Food Saf 4(3):137–141Google Scholar
  13. Durlu-Özkaya F, Ayhan K, Vural N (2001) Biogenic amines produced by Enterobacteriaceae isolated from meat products. Meat Sci 58(2):163–166CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Ekici K, Şekeroǧlu R, Sancak YC, Noyan T (2004) A note on histamine levels in Turkish style fermented sausages. Meat Sci 68(1):123–125CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Gençcelep H, Kaban G, Aksu Mİ, Öz F, Kaya M (2008) Determination of biogenic amines in sucuk. Food Control 19(9):868–872CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Gonzaga VE, Lescano AG, Huamán AA, Salmón-Mulanovich G, Blazes DL (2009) Histamine levels in fish from markets in Lima, Peru. J Food Prot 72(5):1112Google Scholar
  17. Guerrini S, Mangani S, Franci O, Vincenzini M (2010) Biogenic amine producing capability of bacterial populations isolated during processing of different types of dry fermented sausages. Ital J Anim Sci 6(1s):688–690CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Guo X, Guan X, Wang Y, Li L, Wu D, Chen Y, Pei H, Xiao D (2015) Reduction of biogenic amines production by eliminating the PEP4 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation of Chinese rice wine. Food Chem 178:208–211CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Han BZ, Rombouts FM, Nout MR (2001) A Chinese fermented soybean food. Int J Food Microbiol 65(1):1–10CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Kanki M, Yoda T, Tsukamoto T, Baba E (2007) Histidine decarboxylases and their role in accumulation of histamine in tuna and dried saury. Appl Environ Microb 73(5):1467–1473CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Kim MK, Mah JH, Hwang HJ (2009) Biogenic amine formation and bacterial contribution in fish, squid and shellfish. Food Chem 116(1):87–95CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Komprda T, Burdychová R, Dohnal V, Cwiková O, Sládková P, Dvořáčková H (2008) Tyramine production in Dutch-type semi-hard cheese from two different producers. Food Microbiol 25(2):219–227CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Komprda T, Sládková P, Dohnal V (2009) Biogenic amine content in dry fermented sausages as influenced by a producer, spice mix, starter culture, sausage diameter and time of ripening. Meat Sci 83(3):534–542CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Lapa-Guimarães J, Pickova J (2004) New solvent systems for thin-layer chromatographic determination of nine biogenic amines in fish and squid. J Chromatogr A 1045(1):223–232CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Latorre-Moratalla ML, Veciana-Nogués T, Bover-Cid S, Garriga M, Aymerich T, Zanardi E, Vidal-Carou MC (2008) Biogenic amines in traditional fermented sausages produced in selected European countries. Food Chem 107(2):912–921CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Lu S, Xu X, Shu R, Zhou G, Meng Y, Sun Y, Wang P (2010) Characterization of biogenic amines and factors influencing their formation in traditional Chinese sausages. J Food Sci 75(6):366–372CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Lu S, Ji H, Wang Q, Li B, Li K, Xu C, Jiang C (2015) The effects of starter cultures and plant extracts on the biogenic amine accumulation in traditional Chinese smoked horsemeat sausages. Food Control 50:869–875CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Mah JH, Hwang HJ (2009) Effects of food additives on biogenic amine formation in Myeolchi-jeot, a salted and fermented anchovy (Engraulis japonicus). Food Chem 114(1):168–173CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Miguélez-Arrizado MJ, Bover-Cid S, Latorre-Moratalla ML, Vidal-Carou MC (2006) Biogenic amines in Spanish fermented sausages as a function of diameter and artisanal or industrial origin. J Sci Food Agr 86(4):549–557CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Naila A, Flint S, Fletcher G, Bremer P, Meerdink G (2010) Control of biogenic amines in food-existing and emerging approaches. J Food Sci 75(7):139–150CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Papavergou EJ (2011) Biogenic amine levels in dry fermented sausages produced and sold in Greece. Procedia Food Sci 1:1126–1131CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Papavergou EJ, Savvaidis IN, Ambrosiadis IA (2012) Levels of biogenic amines in retail market fermented meat products. Food Chem 135(4):2750–2755CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Pineda A, Carrasco J, Peña-Farfal C, Henríquez-Aedo K, Aranda M (2012) Preliminary evaluation of biogenic amines content in Chilean young varietal wines by HPLC. Food Control 23(1):251–257CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Preti R, Antonelli ML, Bernacchia R, Vinci G (2015) Fast determination of biogenic amines in beverages by a core–shell particle column. Food Chem 187:555–562CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Ruiz-Capillas C, Moral A (2005) Sensory and biochemical aspects of quality of whole bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus) during bulk storage in controlled atmospheres. Food Chem 89(3):347–354CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Suzzi G, Gardini F (2003) Biogenic amines in dry fermented sausages: a review. Int J Food Microbiol 88(1):41–54CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Tang T, Qian K, Shi T, Wang F, Li J, Cao Y, Hu Q (2011) Monitoring the contents of biogenic amines in sufu by HPLC with SPE and pre-column derivatization. Food Control 22(8):1203–1208CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Tateno T, Okada Y, Tsuchidate T, Tanaka T, Fukuda H, Kondo A (2009) Direct production of cadaverine from soluble starch using Corynebacterium glutamicum coexpressing α-amylase and lysine decarboxylase. Appl Microbiol Biot 82(1):115–121CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xia Sun
    • 1
  • Kang Zhou
    • 1
  • Yang Gong
    • 1
  • Nan Zhang
    • 1
  • Min Yang
    • 1
  • Dandan Qing
    • 1
  • Yuewen Li
    • 1
  • Junli Lu
    • 1
  • Jing Li
    • 1
  • Chaohui Feng
    • 1
  • Cheng Li
    • 1
  • Yong Yang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.College of Food Science, Sichuan Agricultural UniversityYaanChina

Personalised recommendations