Food Analytical Methods

, Volume 9, Issue 7, pp 1887–1894 | Cite as

Determination of Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Se, and Zn in Foodstuffs by Atomic Spectrometry After Sample Preparation Using a Low-Cost Closed-Vessel Conductively Heated Digestion System

  • Kelber Miranda
  • Alan Lima Vieira
  • Marcos André Bechlin
  • Felipe Manfroi Fortunato
  • Alex Virgilio
  • Edilene Cristina Ferreira
  • José Anchieta Gomes Neto
Article

Abstract

Establishing fast, simple, low-cost, and efficient sample preparation procedures to determine elements in foodstuffs is a relevant aspect for nutritional and health purposes. For this reason, the recently proposed closed-vessel conductively heated digestion system (CHDS) was evaluated for the digestion of milk powder, chocolate powder, and soluble coffee samples aiming for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, and Zn determinations by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) and Cd, Mo, and Se determinations by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with tandem configuration (ICP-MS/MS). The accuracy was evaluated by analyzing two milk certified reference materials digested by the CHDS and a microwave oven for comparison. When using the CHDS, recoveries for the analytes varied from 91 to 104 %. For microwave digestions, recoveries within the 94–109 % intervals were obtained. The method was then applied to the samples. For comparative purposes, the analytes were also determined in the samples after microwave digestion, and the results between the two digestion systems showed no differences based on a paired t test at a 95 % confidence level. Similar analytical blanks were obtained because quartz digestion tubes were used in both digestion systems. The CHDS with quartz tubes is an interesting alternative for laboratories dedicated to large-scale routine analysis because volatile elements usually found in very low concentrations in food samples such as Cd and Se can also be determined.

Keywords

Closed-vessel conductively heated digestion system CHDS HR-CS FAAS ICP-MS/MS 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kelber Miranda
    • 1
  • Alan Lima Vieira
    • 1
  • Marcos André Bechlin
    • 1
  • Felipe Manfroi Fortunato
    • 1
  • Alex Virgilio
    • 2
  • Edilene Cristina Ferreira
    • 1
  • José Anchieta Gomes Neto
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Analytical ChemistrySão Paulo State UniversityAraraquaraBrazil
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryFederal University of São CarlosSão CarlosBrazil

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