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Food Analytical Methods

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 525–530 | Cite as

Simple Method for Measuring the Peroxide Value in a Colored Lipid

  • Naohiro Gotoh
  • Shino Miyake
  • Hiroko Takei
  • Kumi Sasaki
  • Saori Okuda
  • Michitaka Ishinaga
  • Shun Wada
Article

Abstract

We developed a simple method for quantification of the peroxide value (PV) in colored lipids on the basis of the reaction between triphenylphosphine (TPP) and oxidized oil to afford triphenylphosphineoxide (TPPO). Diphenylphosphineoxide (DPPO) was employed as internal standard. The formed TPPO was analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography–UV spectroscopy with absorption at 260 nm. The conditions that gave the highest correlative calibration curve between the peak area on the chromatogram and peroxide value were identified: the optimum TPP–oxidized oil mix ratio, reaction temperature, and reaction time were found to be 2:1, 40 °C, and 30 min, respectively. Linear calibration curves, passing through the origin, were obtained for PV versus TPPO and TPPO versus DPPO. The quantification limit for this method was 2.01 pmol hydroperoxyl group, which corresponds to a PV value of 0.2 meq/kg in a 10-mg oil sample. This method was used to measure the PV in colored fats and oils or lipids extracted from dark meat and processed food containing a coloring agent. Though the official method could not measure the PVs in the colored lipids, the method proposed here, which uses an inexpensive chemical reagent and machine, could. The developed method could play an important role for food quality control.

Keywords

Colored lipid Diphenylphosphineoxide Food quality HPLC-UV Peroxide value Triphenylphosphine Triphenylphosphineoxide 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naohiro Gotoh
    • 1
  • Shino Miyake
    • 1
  • Hiroko Takei
    • 1
  • Kumi Sasaki
    • 1
  • Saori Okuda
    • 1
  • Michitaka Ishinaga
    • 1
  • Shun Wada
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food Science and TechnologyTokyo University of Marine Science and TechnologyTokyoJapan

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