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The Multiphase Optimization Strategy for Engineering Effective Tobacco Use Interventions

  • Original Article
  • Published:
Annals of Behavioral Medicine

Abstract

The multiphase optimization strategy (MOST) is a new methodological approach for building, optimizing, and evaluating multicomponent interventions. Conceptually rooted in engineering, MOST emphasizes efficiency and careful management of resources to move intervention science forward steadily and incrementally. MOST can be used to guide the evaluation of research evidence, develop an optimal intervention (the best set of intervention components), and enhance the translation of research findings, particularly type II translation. This article uses an ongoing study to illustrate the application of MOST in the evaluation of diverse intervention components derived from the phase-based framework reviewed in the companion article by Baker et al. (Ann Behav Med, in press, 2011). The article also discusses considerations, challenges, and potential benefits associated with using MOST and similar principled approaches to improving intervention efficacy, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness. The applicability of this methodology may extend beyond smoking cessation to the development of behavioral interventions for other chronic health challenges.

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Acknowledgment

This research was supported by a grant 9P50CA143188-11 from the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Collins was supported via grant P50DA10075, from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Dr. Baker was supported via NCI 1K05CA139871. Dr. Piper was supported by grant 1UL1RR025011 from the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program of the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Cook was supported by K08DA021311.

Conflicts of Interest

Linda M. Collins, Timothy B. Baker, Robin Mermelstein, Megan E. Piper, Stevens S. Smith, Bruce A. Christiansen, Tanya R. Schlam, and Jessica W. Cook have no potential conflicts of interest to disclose. Douglas E. Jorenby has received research support from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Cancer Institute, Pfizer, Inc., Sanofi-Synthelabo, and Nabi Biopharmaceuticals. He has received support for educational activities from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Veterans Administration and consulting fees from Nabi Biopharmaceuticals. Over the last 3 years, Michael C. Fiore served as an investigator on research studies at the University of Wisconsin that were funded by Nabi Biopharmaceuticals.

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Correspondence to Megan E. Piper Ph.D..

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Collins, L.M., Baker, T.B., Mermelstein, R.J. et al. The Multiphase Optimization Strategy for Engineering Effective Tobacco Use Interventions. ann. behav. med. 41, 208–226 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12160-010-9253-x

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