Neuroethics

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 103–105 | Cite as

The Bright Future of Neuroethics

  • Veljko Dubljević
  • Victoria H. Saigle
  • Eric Racine
Original Paper

Abstract

Many new scholars have emerged and started to explore novel directions of research in neuroethics. Last year, we hosted the Montreal Neuroethics Conference for Young Researchers to highlight the development of these new scholars and to honour the evolving complexity of the field. As part of this conference, we invited young researchers involved in neuroethics all around the world to submit their work for consideration in an essay contest. Here, we proudly introduce the three best essays we received for this competition and a collection of 21 top-ranked abstracts for the poster contest.

Keywords

Neuroethics Young researchers Future Montreal 

References

  1. 1.
    Craig, J.N. 2016. Incarceration, direct brain intervention, and the right to mental integrity – a reply to Thomas Douglas. Neuroethics. doi:10.1007/s12152-016-9255-x.
  2. 2.
    Gligorov, N. 2016. A defense of brain death. Neuroethics. doi:10.1007/s12152-016-9252-0.
  3. 3.
    Vierra, A. 2016. Psychopathy, mental time travel, and legal responsibility. Neuroethics. doi:10.1007/s12152-015-9243-6.
  4. 4.
    Levy, N. 2014. Psychopaths and blame: the argument from content. Philosophical Psychology 27(3): 351–367.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Veljko Dubljević
    • 1
    • 2
  • Victoria H. Saigle
    • 1
    • 3
  • Eric Racine
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Neuroethics Research UnitInstitut de recherches cliniques de Montréal (IRCM)MontréalCanada
  2. 2.Department of Neurology and NeurosurgeryMcGillMontréalCanada
  3. 3.Department of Experimental Medicine, Biomedical Ethics UnitMcGill UniversityMontréalCanada
  4. 4.Department of Medicine and Department of Social and Preventive MedicineUniversité de MontréalMontrealCanada

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