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Ideation-to-action framework variables involved in the development of suicidal ideation: A network analysis

Abstract

In the field of suicide, three theories (the interpersonal theory of suicide—IPTS, the integrated motivational–volitional—IMV—model, and the three-step theory—3ST) have emerged within the ideation-to-action framework. These theories distinguish between two processes, the development of suicidal ideation and the progression from ideation to suicidal action. In relation to the development of suicidal ideation, each theory proposes different key elements (perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness—IPTS; defeat and entrapment—IMV; and psychological pain and hopelessness—3ST). Through the implementation of network analysis, specifically Gaussian graphical models (GGMs), this study aims to explore the relationship between the variables of the three theories and their relationship (direct and indirect) with suicidal desire after partialing out all the other variables. In this cross-sectional study, 644 young adults, selected according to age, sex, and educational level, completed an online survey. The network analysis indicated that all the variables, except thwarted belongingness, formed a network model with strong connections. Defeat is the most central variable, and it has the greatest influence in the network. Suicidal desire is only connected directly to perceived burdensomeness, psychological pain, and defeat. The development of suicidal ideation could be understood as a complex set of concurrent and potentially interactive variables.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport of Spain for the Training of University Teachers (State Programme for the Promotion of Talent and its Employability) awarded in a public tender (Ref. FPU16/00534).

Funding Statement

This work was supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport of Spain for the Training of University Teachers (State Programme for the Promotion of Talent and its Employability) awarded in a public tender (Ref. FPU16/00534).

Data Availability Statement

The data that support the findings of this study are available on request from the corresponding author. The data are not publicly available due to privacy or ethical restrictions.

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Correspondence to Jorge L. Ordóñez-Carrasco.

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Ethic Approval

This study was performed in accordance with the ethical standards as laid down in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. The study was approved by the Bioethics Committee in Human Research of the University of Almería (Ref: UALBIO2018/018).

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Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Data

The datasets generated during and/or analysed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

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None. The authors who signed the manuscript declare that there is no conflict of interest related to this article.

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Ordóñez-Carrasco, J.L., Sayans-Jiménez, P. & Rojas-Tejada, A.J. Ideation-to-action framework variables involved in the development of suicidal ideation: A network analysis. Curr Psychol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-021-01765-w

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-021-01765-w

Keywords

  • Suicidal ideation
  • Network analysis
  • Ideation-to-action framework
  • Interpersonal theory of suicide
  • Integrated motivational–volitional model
  • Three-step theory