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Does teacher’s emotional support amplify the relationship between parental warm support and academic achievement via self-control in Chinese adolescents: A longitudinal moderated mediation model

Abstract

The current two-wave longitudinal study sought to shed light on the well-established link between parental warm support and academic achievement by testing the potential mediating role of self-control and the moderating role of teacher emotional support among Chinese adolescents. 2569 Chinese students (45.22% girls; Mage = 13.27, SD = 0.67 at baseline) completed self-reported measures at two time points, one year apart. The findings indicated that adolescents with higher parental warm support at baseline tended to have higher academic achievement one year later. Moreover, this link was mediated by self-control that parental warm support would heighten adolescents’ self-control, and in turn increase their academic achievement one year later. Additionally, it was found that when teacher emotional support was higher, parental warmth support at baseline would heighten more academic achievement one year later through self-control. The findings illustrate the value of integrating parents and teachers’ support in adolescent development, which helps them establish better personality traits as high self-control to improve academic achievement.

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Data Availability

The datasets generated during and/or analysed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

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Funding

This study was supported by the Research Program Funds (2020-05-0033-BZPK01) of the Collaborative Innovation Center Assessment toward Basic Education Quality at Beijing Normal University and the Fundamental Research Funds For the Central Universities (2020TS009).

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Correspondence to Caina Li.

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Saeed, M., Zhao, Q., Zhang, B. et al. Does teacher’s emotional support amplify the relationship between parental warm support and academic achievement via self-control in Chinese adolescents: A longitudinal moderated mediation model. Curr Psychol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-021-01695-7

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Keywords

  • Parental warm support
  • Academic achievement
  • Self-control
  • Teacher emotional support