The effect of mindfulness based psychoeducation program on adolescents’ character strengths, mindfulness and academic achievement

Abstract

The research was conducted to prepare a mindfulness-based psychoeducation program for adolescents and to test the effect of the program on character strengths, mindfulness levels, and academic achievement of high school students. The study was designed as mixed-method research, and consisted of two stages. In the first stage, the relationship between mindfulness, character strengths, and academic achievement was investigated. According to the findings, 24.5% of the variance in grade point average was predicted by mindfulness and three character strengths including persistence, prudence, and openness to learning. In the second stage, a mindfulness-based psychoeducation program was developed and its effects on high school students’ perseverance, prudence, love of learning character strengths, mindfulness, and academic achievements were examined in a pretest- posttest randomized control group design. According to results, the 8-week mindfulness-based psychoeducation program increased the level of mindfulness of participants, while partially increasing their three character strengths, and academic achievement.

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Funding

The data that support the findings of this study are available on request from the corresponding author. The datasets generated during and analysed during the current study are not publicly available due to the privacy of participants are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

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Correspondence to Şeyma Güldal.

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All procedures performed in the study involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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The study involved human participants that are ages between 15 and 17 and informed consents were obtained from all of the participants.

Dr. Şeyma GÜLDAL.

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Güldal, Ş., Satan, A. The effect of mindfulness based psychoeducation program on adolescents’ character strengths, mindfulness and academic achievement. Curr Psychol (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-020-01153-w

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Keywords

  • Mindfulness
  • Character strengths
  • Positive psychology
  • Achievement