Effect of the intervention mindfulness based compassionate living on the - level of self - criticism and self – compassion

Abstract

Mindfulness-Based Compassionate Living (MBCL) is an intervention developed to teach individuals to cope with physical, mental, emotional or relational stress in a healthy way. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of a short-term online version of the MBCL intervention on level of self-criticism and self-compassion in a non-clinical convenience sample. The participants were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. After the intervention and the follow-up, the experimental group consisted of 26 participants who were sent daily emails instructing them to complete the MBCL tasks for 15 consecutive days. At that time, the control group consisted of the remaining 24 participants who did not perform any of the tasks. Data collection was conducted through an online battery of questionnaires measuring level of self-criticism and self-compassion, which we administered three times – before the intervention, after the intervention and as a follow-up two months later. The data were analysed using the repeated measures ANOVA and paired samples t-test. In case of non- normal distribution, the Friedman test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used. The results showed a significant decrease in level of self-criticism and a significant increase in level of self-compassion after completion of the MBCL intervention, and the results persisted in the follow-up. The main limitations of our research are the small sample and high attrition rate. To conclude, the MBCL could also be administered in online format and have a lasting impact on self-criticism and self-compassion.

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Fig. 1

Data Availability

In order to comply with the ethics approvals of the study protocols, data cannot be made accessible through a public repository. However, data are available upon request for researchers who consent to adhering to the ethical regulations for confidential data.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge Andrej Jeleník, the certified trainer of MBCL, for consulting shorter online version of MBCL.

Funding

Writing this work was supported by the Vedecká grantová agentúra VEGA under Grant 1/0075/19.

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Contributions

JH, NO, and BS designed research project. JH and NO together with a certified trainer of MBCL designed the shortened version of the intervention. NO collected data. NO performed the statistical analysis. NO wrote the first draft of the article. All authors JH, BS, and NO interpreted the results, revised the manuscript and read and approved the final manuscript.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Júlia Halamová.

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The authors declare that they have no potential conflicts of interests.

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All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Written informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Ondrejková, N., Halamová, J. & Strnádelová, B. Effect of the intervention mindfulness based compassionate living on the - level of self - criticism and self – compassion. Curr Psychol (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-020-00799-w

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Keywords

  • Self-compassion
  • Self-criticism
  • Intervention
  • Mindfulness-based compassionate living
  • Experiment
  • Randomised control trial