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Feedback-seeking culture moderates the relationship between positive feedback and task performance

Abstract

Research exploring feedback in the form of workplace performance appraisals or in educational contexts, is common. However, there is a dearth of research to inform evidence-based practice in every-day positive feedback. In the current study, 289 employed adults reported on their managers’ positive feedback, the feedback-seeking culture, and rated their own task performance. Findings suggest that managerial positive feedback, but not feedback-seeking culture, meaningfully predicts task performance. Furthermore, the relationship between positive feedback and task performance is partially moderated by the feedback-seeking culture. The current study further contextualises our understanding of workplace positive feedback and draws recommendations for managerial practice surrounding congruency between culture and practice.

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Evans, T.R., Dobrosielska, A. Feedback-seeking culture moderates the relationship between positive feedback and task performance. Curr Psychol 40, 3401–3408 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-019-00248-3

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Keywords

  • Positive feedback
  • Manager communication
  • Feedback
  • Task performance
  • Feedback environment